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Episode 8 of podcast is now live.

The podcasts will also be available on iTunesPlayerFM and other podcast catchers within the next 24 hours.

As always, I can be found on Instagram and Ravelry. There is also a Ravelry Group for the Mrs M’s Curiosity Cabinet podcast.

I am back to sock knitting and have been cracking on with my pair of Planum socks (by Clare Devine) in Cuthbert Sock Yarn, which Whistlebare Farm sent me for free to include my no-nylon sock experiment. As I am already smitten with the potential of this Mohair/Wensleydale blend, I picked up another skein of it at Nottingham Yarn Expo, where I met Alice of Whistlebare Farm. She shared some interesting facts about mohair’s properties.

As I deepen my dressmaking experience, I am increasingly looking at how I can use both my knitting and sewing skills to achieve a more natural wardrobe that meets my practical needs and appeals to my aesthetic senses. Although excluding certain types of fabrics from my wardrobe may limit my choice, I am finding different ways to achieve the look and functionality I want.

In this episode I talk about how I am knitting to satisfy my desire for patterns in some of my clothes. I explain how lace knitting is already doing this, e.g. with my Pomme de Pin cardigan (by Amy Christoffers), knit in Blacker Yarns’ Classic 4ply. I decided to add the Autumn’s End sweater (by Alana Dakos), knit in Dark Corriedale DK from Wooltops, to my wardrobe for the same reason but achieved a slightly unexpected but equally delightful pattern effect. And I am also considering incorporating some stranded colour work knitting into my wardrobe to add patterns, possibly in the form of the Northdale sweater from Gudrun Johnston’s The Shetland Trader, Book Two.

My wardrobe engineering has also involved looking for a solution to my lining/slip dilemma. In particular, how to balance the need for an antistatic layer to stop my cotton dresses and skirts clinging to my tights or riding up with my environmental qualms about manmade fabrics.

I also review Folk Fashion – Understanding Handmade Clothes by Amy Twigger Holroyd. I mentioned that the recommended retail price of the book is £14.99 but I note that it is currently available for £10.49 (plus P&P) directly from the publisher.

Finally, I share some inspiring gems. Wovember heads the list! There are many delightful tales of the link between wellness and wool on the website and there is also much inspiration to be found on Instagram under the hashtags: #wearwoolforwovember, #wovemberinstachallenge and #wovember2017. I also recommend two inspiring makers whose mindset resonates with me:

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Music: As I figure by Kevin MacLeod on FreeMusicArchive and licensed under Creative Commons By Attribution 3.0 License

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